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image: One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

By | August 26, 2016

Precursor T cells bearing the same antigen receptor adopt two different fates in mice.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Seven Skeletons</em>

Book Excerpt from Seven Skeletons

By | August 1, 2016

In Chapter 1, “The Old Man of La Chapelle: The Patriarch of Paleo,” author Lydia Pyne explains the public's evolving conception of the first complete Neanderthal skeleton found and described by scientists.

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By ditching traditional agar-based media, two biochemists captured iconic images of Myxococcus in 1982.

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image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

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image: Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

By | August 1, 2016

Immune cells called macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of mice migrate to injured livers and aid in repair.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | August 1, 2016

Brexit's effect on science, melding disciplines, and more

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image: The Genes Underlying Autism Are Coming Into Focus

The Genes Underlying Autism Are Coming Into Focus

By | August 1, 2016

As researchers sequence the DNA of thousands of kids with autism, dozens of genetic subgroups are emerging.

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image: Different Brains, Similar Wiring

Different Brains, Similar Wiring

By | July 22, 2016

The brains of primates and mice follow the same exponential rule of connectivity, according to a study.

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image: Mapping the Human Connectome

Mapping the Human Connectome

By | July 20, 2016

A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

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The same genes can make people more sensitive to their experiences, “for better of for worse,” psychologists argue.

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