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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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image: Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

By | April 18, 2017

A double-expansion technique embeds brain tissue in the absorbent material of diapers to stretch out cells for easier visualization.

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image: Image of the Day: Tail Eyes

Image of the Day: Tail Eyes

By | April 3, 2017

Following treatment with a migraine drug, blind tadpoles were able to process visual information through eyes transplanted onto their tails.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | April 1, 2017

Eugene Garfield, the cancer moonshot, employee genetic testing, and more

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image: Paralyzed Man Moves Arm with Neuroprosthetic

Paralyzed Man Moves Arm with Neuroprosthetic

By | March 30, 2017

Two chips implanted in a quadriplegic patient’s motor cortex and 36 electrodes in his right arm allow the man to control the movement of his right arm and hand.

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image: Image of the Day: Neon Neurons

Image of the Day: Neon Neurons

By | March 30, 2017

Neuroscientists combined a variety of techniques—drawing, optical engineering, and gold-etching—to create this artistic depiction of the human brain.

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image: San People Write Ethical Code for Research

San People Write Ethical Code for Research

By | March 21, 2017

With lifestyles similar to our hunter-gatherer ancestors, the San people of Southern Africa are popular study subjects.

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image: Singing Through Tone Deafness

Singing Through Tone Deafness

By | March 17, 2017

Author Tim Falconer didn't take his congenital amusia lying down. With the help of neuroscientists and vocal coaches, he tried to teach himself to sing against all odds.

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image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

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