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The Scientist

» brain and cell & molecular biology

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image: Allele Linked to Obesity in People

Allele Linked to Obesity in People

By | November 3, 2015

A single nucleotide polymorphism in BDNF is tied with lower levels of the protein and higher body-mass index.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Embracing the Unknown

Embracing the Unknown

By | November 1, 2015

Researchers are showing that ambiguity can be essential to brain development.

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image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

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image: Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

By , and | November 1, 2015

Obese people are at higher risk for developing cancer, have worse prognoses once diagnosed, and are often resistant to chemotherapy regimens. The question is, Why?

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image: Obesogens

Obesogens

By | November 1, 2015

Low doses of environmental chemicals can make animals gain weight. Whether they do the same to humans is a thorny issue.

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image: A Complex Disorder

A Complex Disorder

By , and | November 1, 2015

Factors that likely contribute to obesity include disruptions to intercellular signaling, increased inflammation, and changes to the gut microbiome.  

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image: Fat Factors

Fat Factors

By | November 1, 2015

A mouse's exposure to certain environmental chemicals can lead the animal—and its offspring and grandoffspring—to be overweight.

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image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

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image: Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

By | October 26, 2015

Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.

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