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image: Different Brains, Similar Wiring

Different Brains, Similar Wiring

By | July 22, 2016

The brains of primates and mice follow the same exponential rule of connectivity, according to a study.

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image: Mapping the Human Connectome

Mapping the Human Connectome

By | July 20, 2016

A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

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The same genes can make people more sensitive to their experiences, “for better of for worse,” psychologists argue.

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image: Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Reveals Neuronal Diversity

Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Reveals Neuronal Diversity

By | June 23, 2016

Using a new approach to analyze the transcriptomes of thousands of individual cell nuclei in postmortem brains, researchers identify multiple neuronal subtypes.

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image: Bird Brains Have Numerous Neurons

Bird Brains Have Numerous Neurons

By | June 14, 2016

Many avian species have more neurons than do mammals with similar-mass brains.

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Another study finds similar gene expression in the brains of people with these disorders.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Amyloid Thwarts Microbial Invaders

Amyloid Thwarts Microbial Invaders

By | May 25, 2016

Alzheimer’s disease–associated amyloid-β peptides trap microbes in the brains of mice and in the guts of nematodes, a study shows. 

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