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image: Bioresorbable Brain Implants

Bioresorbable Brain Implants

By | January 20, 2016

Sensors made from biodegrading materials may soon provide a safe, cost-effective alternative to current technology, a study shows.

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image: Practical Proteomes

Practical Proteomes

By | January 1, 2016

Cell type–specific proteomic analyses are now possible from paraffin-embedded tissues.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

By | November 19, 2015

A shorter crease in the medial prefrontal cortex is linked with a higher risk of schizophrenics experiencing hallucinations.

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image: Stressed Shore Crabs

Stressed Shore Crabs

By | November 12, 2015

Electrical shocks cause a physiological stress response in invertebrates previously thought incapable of feeling pain.

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image: Breaching the Blood-Brain Barrier

Breaching the Blood-Brain Barrier

By | November 11, 2015

Researchers deliver cancer-fighting drugs to a patient’s brain via the bloodstream, penetrating the blood-brain barrier for the first time.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Allele Linked to Obesity in People

Allele Linked to Obesity in People

By | November 3, 2015

A single nucleotide polymorphism in BDNF is tied with lower levels of the protein and higher body-mass index.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Embracing the Unknown

Embracing the Unknown

By | November 1, 2015

Researchers are showing that ambiguity can be essential to brain development.

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