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image: More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

By | November 9, 2016

Researchers say they have sufficient in vitro and animal data to apply for human testing.

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Family members with a certain gene variant had unnecessary interventions, highlighting the potential hazards of precision medicine.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Immunity in the Brain

Immunity in the Brain

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers document the diverse roles of immune cells in neuronal health and disease.

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As people continue to tell tall tales, fMRI data show certain brain regions become less busy.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | October 24, 2016

Virus’s effect on RNA methylation; identifying brain cells targeted by Zika; virus found in vaginal secretions for two weeks after infection; updated CDC recommendations for Miami

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image: Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

By | October 19, 2016

Researchers discover that neutrophil extracellular traps help cancers spread, and design enzyme-loaded nanoparticles to destroy them.

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Once implanted in mice, the edited stem cells produced normal hemoglobin.

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Nascent Neurons Journey Through Newborn Brain

Nascent Neurons Journey Through Newborn Brain

By | October 6, 2016

Young cells make their way to the frontal lobe to create new circuits in the brains of infants, researchers report. 

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