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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

By | July 1, 2016

The University of St. Andrews behavioral ecologist studies the social structures and behaviors of whales and dolphins, recording and analyzing their acoustic communications.

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image: Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

By | July 1, 2016

Watching the decomposition of pig carcasses anchored to the seafloor is helping forensic researchers understand what to expect of human remains dumped in the ocean.

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image: Well-Brined Pork

Well-Brined Pork

By | July 1, 2016

Watch what happens when marine organisms have their way with a sunken pig carcass.

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image: Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Reveals Neuronal Diversity

Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Reveals Neuronal Diversity

By | June 23, 2016

Using a new approach to analyze the transcriptomes of thousands of individual cell nuclei in postmortem brains, researchers identify multiple neuronal subtypes.

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image: Identifying Resilient Reefs

Identifying Resilient Reefs

By | June 16, 2016

Researchers identify areas where marine ecosystems are faring better or worse than predicted in hopes of saving the world’s corals.

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image: Prominent Ecologist Dies

Prominent Ecologist Dies

By | June 16, 2016

Bob Paine, best known for introducing the idea of “keystone species,” has passed away at age 83.

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image: Bird Brains Have Numerous Neurons

Bird Brains Have Numerous Neurons

By | June 14, 2016

Many avian species have more neurons than do mammals with similar-mass brains.

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Another study finds similar gene expression in the brains of people with these disorders.

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image: Amyloid Thwarts Microbial Invaders

Amyloid Thwarts Microbial Invaders

By | May 25, 2016

Alzheimer’s disease–associated amyloid-β peptides trap microbes in the brains of mice and in the guts of nematodes, a study shows. 

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