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image: Brain Massage

Brain Massage

By | November 1, 2014

Researchers may be able to improve memory by discharging magnetic pulses on the skull to alter the neural activity at and beneath the brain’s surface.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2014

Leonardo's Brain, The Future of the Brain, Dodging Extinction, and Arrival of the Fittest

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image: Mixed Signals

Mixed Signals

By | November 1, 2014

Individual neurons in the dorsomedial striatum integrate responses to sight and touch.

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image: Seizing the Opportunity

Seizing the Opportunity

By | November 1, 2014

Ron Blackwell helps neuroscientists map the circuitry of face perception by letting them stimulate his brain with electricity.

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image: Uncommonly Rare

Uncommonly Rare

By | November 1, 2014

How one of the rarest neurodegenerative diseases could lend insight into ubiquitous neuroprotective processes

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image: A Face to Remember

A Face to Remember

By | November 1, 2014

Once dominated by correlational studies, face-perception research is moving into the realm of experimentation—and gaining tremendous insight.

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image: Modeling Ebola in Mice

Modeling Ebola in Mice

By | October 30, 2014

A genetically diverse group of mice represents the complete spectrum of human outcomes from Ebola virus infection.

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image: 45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

By | October 24, 2014

The oldest human genome to have been sequenced came from a leg bone preserved in Siberia.

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image: Next Generation: Freeze-Dried Gene Networks

Next Generation: Freeze-Dried Gene Networks

By | October 23, 2014

Researchers devise a way to preserve bits of paper containing synthetic gene networks, which can be easily stored and widely distributed. Rehydrated, transcription and translation “come to life.”

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image: Ancient Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant

Ancient Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant

By | October 21, 2014

Five-thousand years after agricultural practices spread across Neolithic Europe, human populations remained unable to digest sugars from the milk of mammals.

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