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image: Enzyme Improves CRISPR

Enzyme Improves CRISPR

By | April 1, 2015

A smaller Cas9 protein enables in vivo genome engineering via viral vectors.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>p53</em>

Book Excerpt from p53

By | April 1, 2015

In Chapter 12, "Of Mice and Men," author Sue Armstrong recounts the point at which researchers moved from working with p53 in tissue culture to studying the gene in animal models.


image: Cancer Kismet

Cancer Kismet

By | April 1, 2015

Fate mapping allows researchers to follow cancer progression from its cell type of origin.

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image: Contributors


By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.


image: Setbacks and Great Leaps

Setbacks and Great Leaps

By | April 1, 2015

The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.

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image: The Challenges of Precision

The Challenges of Precision

By | April 1, 2015

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

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image: To Each His Own

To Each His Own

By | April 1, 2015

Cancer treatment becomes more and more personal.


image: Two-Faced RNAs

Two-Faced RNAs

By | April 1, 2015

The same microRNAs can have opposing roles in cancer.


image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?


image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.


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