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image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.


image: Viruses Prefer the Cold

Viruses Prefer the Cold

By | May 20, 2013

Chilly weather could impede the immune reactions that most effectively contain viruses like the common cold.  


image: Protective Phages

Protective Phages

By | May 20, 2013

Viruses that attack bacteria may be an important component of our gut microbiota.


image: Watching the Brain Remember

Watching the Brain Remember

By | May 16, 2013

For the first time, researchers visualize zebrafish memory retrieval in real time.


image: Clock Genes Linked to Depression

Clock Genes Linked to Depression

By | May 15, 2013

Patients with major depressive disorder appear to have malfunctioning circadian rhythms, which could lead researchers to new avenues for treatment.


image: Scientists Discuss BRAIN Initiative

Scientists Discuss BRAIN Initiative

By | May 13, 2013

Last week brought scientists one step closer to outlining a plan for the massive government-funded project.  


image: Week in Review: May 6 – 10

Week in Review: May 6 – 10

By | May 10, 2013

Telomeres and disease; Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may fight malaria; bat tongue mops nectar; newly sequenced genomes


image: The Neurobiology of Individuality

The Neurobiology of Individuality

By | May 9, 2013

Mice that explore more have higher levels of neurogenesis, suggesting a link between experience, brain plasticity, and the emergence of distinct personalities.


image: Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

By | May 3, 2013

The brain’s role in aging; tracking disease; understanding the new flu virus; no autism-Lyme link; one drug’s journey from bench to bedside


image: Bacterial Conduit

Bacterial Conduit

By | May 1, 2013

Desulfobulbaceae bacteria were recently discovered to form centimeter-long cables, containing thousands of cells that share an outer membrane.


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