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image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

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image: Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

By | November 6, 2013

Cells that temporarily restrain their immune systems give babies’ gut bacteria a chance to settle down. 

1 Comment

image: Frisky Fruit Flies

Frisky Fruit Flies

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that Drosophila females upregulate an immune gene for protection against sexually transmitted infections before copulation.

1 Comment

image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

4 Comments

image: Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

By | October 20, 2013

An immune suppressive drug can unexpectedly help immunized mice fight off many strains of flu.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

image: Turkish Scientists Face Injustice

Turkish Scientists Face Injustice

By | August 5, 2013

Eight academics are among those being unfairly persecuted by Turkish officials, according to a new report from scientific academies’ human rights committees.

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