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Genghis Jon

By | February 1, 2012

By helping Mongolians cultivate an understanding of their native insect fauna, scientists hope to protect the country's unique yet fragile ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: Science Afield

Science Afield

By | February 1, 2012

Portable wet-lab kits allow even soldiers stationed in war zones to earn college science credits.

9 Comments

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2012

February 2012's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: Sweet and Sour Science

Sweet and Sour Science

By | February 1, 2012

Japanese researchers unravel the mystery of miracle fruit.

18 Comments

image: Resignations Over AIDS Denial

Resignations Over AIDS Denial

By | January 31, 2012

A member of an Italian journal’s editorial board resigns in protest of a paper denying the link between HIV and AIDs.

3 Comments

image: Opinion: Celebrities Pushing Drugs?

Opinion: Celebrities Pushing Drugs?

By | January 30, 2012

Celebrity spokespeople for pharma companies can manipulate the public’s understanding of disease.

30 Comments

image: A Peer Review Revolution?

A Peer Review Revolution?

By | January 24, 2012

A new social network provides a novel forum for science publishing and peer review.

9 Comments

image: JSTOR For Free

JSTOR For Free

By | January 17, 2012

JSTOR, the online archive of scholarly journal articles, is offering free but limited access to its database.

0 Comments

image: Britain Announces New University

Britain Announces New University

By | January 5, 2012

The UK’s universities minister announces a plan for a new science and tech university funded entirely by non-government dollars.

3 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | January 4, 2012

A roundup of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

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