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image: Opinion: Academia Suppresses Creativity

Opinion: Academia Suppresses Creativity

By | May 9, 2012

By discouraging change, universities are stunting scientific innovation, leadership, and growth.

2 Comments

image: Death by Lab-Acquired Infection?

Death by Lab-Acquired Infection?

By | May 8, 2012

A researcher dead from a meningococcal infection may have acquired it in his laboratory.

6 Comments

image: Gene Signaling by Remote

Gene Signaling by Remote

By | May 7, 2012

Nanoparticles in mice can be switched on to activate insulin production using a radio signal.

0 Comments

image: First Drug from GM Plant Approved

First Drug from GM Plant Approved

By | May 4, 2012

A human enzyme grown in carrot cells will treat patients with Gaucher disease.

10 Comments

image: Nervous Mice Get Worse Cancer

Nervous Mice Get Worse Cancer

By | May 3, 2012

Anxious mice are more likely to come down with aggressive skin cancer than those who show less stress on behavioral tests.

0 Comments

image: FDA Disputes Data Under-Reporting

FDA Disputes Data Under-Reporting

By | May 2, 2012

The FDA and NIH dispute reports that clinical trial data is being under-reported.

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image: Telomere Basics

Telomere Basics

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 

4 Comments

In Chapter 12, "The Opium Fields," author Marc Lewis recounts one night spent in the brain chemistry-bending grip of opium addiction.

3 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2012

Masters of the Planet, Learning from the Octopus, Darwin’s Devices, and Psychology’s Ghosts

2 Comments

Contributors

May 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2012 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

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