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image: Our Missing Genes

Our Missing Genes

By | February 17, 2012

New research suggests that the average person has about 20 genes with loss-of-function mutations—many more than previously suspected.

2 Comments

image: TB Screen Glows Green

TB Screen Glows Green

By | February 13, 2012

Infection by GFP-encoding viruses enables quick, easy detection of tuberculosis in patient samples.

2 Comments

image: <em>C. diff</em> Infection Source Unclear

C. diff Infection Source Unclear

By | February 7, 2012

Only a quarter of Clostridium difficile infections in one hospital system were traced to contact with a symptomatic patient.

15 Comments

image: Isolating Genomes from the Masses

Isolating Genomes from the Masses

By | February 6, 2012

Researchers find a way to determine the sequence of a single species from metagenomics data of entire microbial communities.

12 Comments

image: Federal Biosecurity Panel Speaks

Federal Biosecurity Panel Speaks

By | February 1, 2012

The US National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity explains why it recommended redacting the details of studies reporting on a highly transmissible H5N1 strain.

6 Comments

image: Gain a Chromosome and Adapt

Gain a Chromosome and Adapt

By | January 30, 2012

Research in yeast shows that aneuploidy is both a consequence of and an adaptation to stress.

18 Comments

image: Speed Gene Traced to One Founder

Speed Gene Traced to One Founder

By | January 26, 2012

Researchers track a racehorse “speed gene” back to a single mare in the United Kingdom.

0 Comments

image: Longevity Study Lives On

Longevity Study Lives On

By | January 24, 2012

A reanalysis of the study reporting genes linked to extremely long life, which was retracted from Science last summer, is published in PLoS ONE.

3 Comments

image: Arsenic-based Life Challenged Again

Arsenic-based Life Challenged Again

By | January 24, 2012

An attempt to regrow the infamous GFAJ-1 bacteria, reported to incorporate arsenic into its DNA backbone, has failed.

9 Comments

image: Marooned Chromosomes Cause Cancer?

Marooned Chromosomes Cause Cancer?

By | January 23, 2012

Chromosomes accidentally stranded outside of the nucleus could contribute to cancer formation.

3 Comments

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Mettler Toledo
BD Biosciences
BD Biosciences