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image: Circuit Dynamo

Circuit Dynamo

By | October 1, 2015

Eve Marder’s quest to understand neurotransmitter signaling is more than 40 years old and still going strong.


image: Contributors


By | October 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2015 issue of The Scientist.


image: Decon Recon

Decon Recon

By | October 1, 2015

Published genomes are chock-full of contamination. But as awareness of the problem grows, so do methods to help combat it.

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image: Holding Neurons Steady

Holding Neurons Steady

By | October 1, 2015

Scientists engineer a feedback loop to fine-tune neuron activity with optogenetics.


image: Into the Limelight

Into the Limelight

By | October 1, 2015

Glial cells were once considered neurons’ supporting actors, but new methods and model organisms are revealing their true importance in brain function.


image: Jacob Hooker: Weaver of Brain Science

Jacob Hooker: Weaver of Brain Science

By | October 1, 2015

Director of Radiochemistry, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging; Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School. Age: 35


image: Lefties, Language, and Lateralization

Lefties, Language, and Lateralization

By | October 1, 2015

The long-sought genetic link between handedness and language lateralization patterns in the brain is turning out to be illusory.


image: Negative Thinking

Negative Thinking

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers uncover the first light-controlled negative-ion channels in algae, and they are fast.


image: Seeing Things

Seeing Things

By | October 1, 2015

In Oliver Sacks's 2009 TED Talk, the famed physician and writer describes the neurological nature of hallucinations.


image: Special Delivery

Special Delivery

By | October 1, 2015

Neurons in new brains and old


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