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image: Week in Review: September 9–13

Week in Review: September 9–13

By | September 13, 2013

A new type of stem cell; a parasitic ant species protects its hosts; reasons for biodiversity among tropical amphibians; transforming translational research

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image: Drivers of Tropical Diversity

Drivers of Tropical Diversity

By | September 10, 2013

Researchers pinpoint rapid speciation, reduced extinction rates as reasons for increased diversity among tropical amphibians.

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image: Croakus Interruptus

Croakus Interruptus

By | June 1, 2013

During frogs’ hectic mass breedings, females often die. But one species appears to have found a work-around: males harvest and fertilize their partners' eggs after her death.

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image: Salamander Evolution

Salamander Evolution

By | June 1, 2013

Yale University evolutionary biologist Steven Brady studies the evolutionary impacts of roads on the amphibians.

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image: Sequencing the Underdogs

Sequencing the Underdogs

By | March 8, 2013

Transcriptome studies reveal new insights about unusual animals whose genomes have not been sequenced.

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image: Diversity Defeats Disease

Diversity Defeats Disease

By | February 13, 2013

In a pond, more amphibian species mean decreased chances of disease spread.

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image: Opinion: Paradoxical Amphibians

Opinion: Paradoxical Amphibians

By | February 7, 2013

New amphibian species are being discovered at an exciting rate, yet they are also the vertebrates most at risk of extinction.

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image: Frog-Killing Fungus Thrives

Frog-Killing Fungus Thrives

By | August 15, 2012

Global trade in live bullfrogs and a more volatile, changing climate worsen a deadly amphibian fungus.

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image: “Extinct” Toad Rediscovered

“Extinct” Toad Rediscovered

By | June 21, 2012

A yellow-bellied dwarf toad, last sighted in 1876, is rediscovered in Sri Lanka.

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image: Pick your frog poison

Pick your frog poison

By | May 31, 2011

Human development may destroy natural habitats, but it could also provide amphibians with a safe haven from deadly fungal infections.

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