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image: Electrode-Free Electrophysiology

Electrode-Free Electrophysiology

By | October 22, 2015

Optogenetics has evolved beyond its neuron-stimulating capacities to an all-optical approach for both manipulating and recording cells.

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image: Speaking of Neuroscience

Speaking of Neuroscience

By | October 22, 2015

A selection of notable quotes from the Society for Neuroscience meeting

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image: Dogs Originated in Central Asia

Dogs Originated in Central Asia

By | October 21, 2015

Man’s best friend was domesticated near Nepal and Mongolia at least 15,000 years ago, according to a genetic analysis.

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image: Life Before 4 Billion Years Ago?

Life Before 4 Billion Years Ago?

By | October 20, 2015

A new estimate of the origin of life on Earth pushes back the date by 300 million years.

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image: New Hope for Alzheimer’s Blood Test

New Hope for Alzheimer’s Blood Test

By | October 19, 2015

Using autoantibodies as biomarkers, researchers could soon identify people at the highest risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases much earlier than existing methods.

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image: Cognitive Neuroscience Lurking in Art

Cognitive Neuroscience Lurking in Art

By | October 19, 2015

What can neuroscientists learn from the masters and other artists?

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image: Newfound Neurons

Newfound Neurons

By | October 19, 2015

Researchers identify a new type of brain cell in male Caenorhabditis elegans.

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image: Neurons from Glia In Vivo

Neurons from Glia In Vivo

By | October 19, 2015

Scientists present new recipes for directly converting glial cells to neurons in mouse brains.

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image: Brain Activity Identifies Individuals

Brain Activity Identifies Individuals

By | October 12, 2015

Neural connectome patterns differ enough between people to use them as a fingerprint.

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image: Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

By | October 5, 2015

Researchers have selectively activated a specific neural pathway to manipulate a primate’s behavior.

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