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image: Opinion: Parachuting off the Patent Cliff

Opinion: Parachuting off the Patent Cliff

By | December 6, 2012

As the United States edges ever closer to the dreaded fiscal cliff, the pharmaceutical industry approaches a precipice of its own.

4 Comments

image: Marlboro Chicks

Marlboro Chicks

By | December 5, 2012

Two species of songbirds pack their nests with scavenged cigarette butts that repel irksome parasites.

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fat's Immune Sentinels

Fat's Immune Sentinels

By | December 1, 2012

Certain immune cells keep adipose tissue in check by helping to define normal and abnormal physiological states.

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image: How Plants Feel

How Plants Feel

By | December 1, 2012

A hormone called jasmonate mediates plants' responses to touch and can boost defenses against pests.

1 Comment

image: Microchannel Masterpiece

Microchannel Masterpiece

By | December 1, 2012

A precision microfluidic system enables single-cell analysis of growth and division.

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image: Neil Bence: Manipulating Degradation

Neil Bence: Manipulating Degradation

By | December 1, 2012

Senior Scientist, Millennium Pharmaceuticals: The Takeda Oncology Company Age: 39

0 Comments

image: Coughing Seashells

Coughing Seashells

By | November 28, 2012

A type of scallop expels water and waste through a sort of cough that could reveal clues about water quality.

1 Comment

image: Beetles Warm BC Forests

Beetles Warm BC Forests

By | November 27, 2012

Using satellite data, researchers calculate that mountain pine beetle infestations raise summertime temperatures in British Columbia’s pine forests by 1 degree Celsius.

3 Comments

image: Old New Species

Old New Species

By | November 20, 2012

Decades can pass between the discovery of a new animal or plant and its official debut in the scientific literature.

4 Comments

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