The Scientist

» drug discovery and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Opinion: Bench to Bedside

Opinion: Bench to Bedside

By | April 30, 2013

A chance discovery made in my lab 17 years ago results in the first drug that can help patients with a rare disease.

0 Comments

image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

0 Comments

image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

0 Comments

image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

0 Comments

image: From Toxins to Therapeutics

From Toxins to Therapeutics

By | March 19, 2013

Researchers are finding new drugs for chronic pain and autoimmune diseases by modifying animal venom-derived molecules that target the nervous and immune systems.

1 Comment

image: FDA Reform to Boost US Economy?

FDA Reform to Boost US Economy?

By | March 5, 2013

Two experts propose replacing Phase 3 trials with smaller, faster alternatives and post-market surveillance to invigorate the pharmaceutical industry.

0 Comments

image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

0 Comments

image: Antibiotic Bouncer

Antibiotic Bouncer

By | March 1, 2013

Contrary to previous assumptions that macrolide antibiotics completely block the exit tunnel of ribosomes, new evidence shows that some peptides are allowed to pass.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Teenage Drug Hunter

Teenage Drug Hunter

By | March 1, 2013

An Oregon teenager spent a summer in a New York biochemistry lab helping to discover a novel molecule that could become the next commercial nonaddictive painkiller.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Grass Routes
    Features Grass Routes

    Researchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.

  3. Studies Retracted After UCLA Investigation
  4. Trump Nominates Sam Clovis to Lead USDA Research
AAAS