The Scientist

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

2 Comments

image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

1 Comment

image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

0 Comments

image: Is Frog Skin a Red Herring?

Is Frog Skin a Red Herring?

By | January 2, 2013

Despite decades of work, compounds in frog skins have failed to yield new antibiotics. Why?

2 Comments

image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Parachuting off the Patent Cliff

Opinion: Parachuting off the Patent Cliff

By | December 6, 2012

As the United States edges ever closer to the dreaded fiscal cliff, the pharmaceutical industry approaches a precipice of its own.

4 Comments

image: Neil Bence: Manipulating Degradation

Neil Bence: Manipulating Degradation

By | December 1, 2012

Senior Scientist, Millennium Pharmaceuticals: The Takeda Oncology Company Age: 39

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Tumor Snipers

Tumor Snipers

By | November 1, 2012

After two headline successes, companies rush to develop “smart bomb” cancer drugs.

0 Comments

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