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The Scientist

» drug discovery and developmental biology

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: From Toxins to Therapeutics

From Toxins to Therapeutics

By | March 19, 2013

Researchers are finding new drugs for chronic pain and autoimmune diseases by modifying animal venom-derived molecules that target the nervous and immune systems.

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FDA Reform to Boost US Economy?

By | March 5, 2013

Two experts propose replacing Phase 3 trials with smaller, faster alternatives and post-market surveillance to invigorate the pharmaceutical industry.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Antibiotic Bouncer

Antibiotic Bouncer

By | March 1, 2013

Contrary to previous assumptions that macrolide antibiotics completely block the exit tunnel of ribosomes, new evidence shows that some peptides are allowed to pass.

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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Teenage Drug Hunter

By | March 1, 2013

An Oregon teenager spent a summer in a New York biochemistry lab helping to discover a novel molecule that could become the next commercial nonaddictive painkiller.

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Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

1 Comment

image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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