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image: Electron Shuffle

Electron Shuffle

By | May 1, 2013

Shewanella bacteria generate energy for survival by transporting electrons to nearby mineral surfaces.

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image: Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

By | May 1, 2013

Research Associate, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Age: 27

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image: We're All Connected

We're All Connected

By | May 1, 2013

A look at some of biology’s communication networks

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image: Live Wires

Live Wires

By | May 1, 2013

Discoveries of microbial communities that transfer electrons between cells and across relatively long distances are launching a new field of microbiology.

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image: Autism-Lyme Correlation Debunked

Autism-Lyme Correlation Debunked

By | April 30, 2013

Researchers find zero evidence for Lyme-induced autism.

11 Comments

image: Opinion: Bench to Bedside

Opinion: Bench to Bedside

By | April 30, 2013

A chance discovery made in my lab 17 years ago results in the first drug that can help patients with a rare disease.

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image: Virus Latency Causes Cattle Disease?

Virus Latency Causes Cattle Disease?

By | April 29, 2013

Researchers identify a herpesvirus gene persisting in the cells of calves suffering from malignant catarrhal disease.

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image: Week in Review: April 22–26

Week in Review: April 22–26

By | April 26, 2013

Double helix celebrates 60; detecting calories without taste; bacteria vs. tumor; perceptual consciousness in babies

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image: Tumors Fall to Radioactive Bacteria

Tumors Fall to Radioactive Bacteria

By | April 22, 2013

Researchers use bacteria to deliver radiation to shrink pancreatic tumors in mice.

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image: Virus Versus Bacteria

Virus Versus Bacteria

By | April 17, 2013

A newly developed drug, modeled after a bacteria-infecting virus, is less likely to become antibiotic resistant.

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