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image: Imagining a “World Without Microbes”

Imagining a “World Without Microbes”

By | December 18, 2014

Eradication of microbial disease likely accompanied by poor quality of life for remaining species

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image: Microbes Could Help Solve Sex Crimes

Microbes Could Help Solve Sex Crimes

By | December 17, 2014

Microbial species found in pubic hair samples could help track down criminals.

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image: Mining Existing Drugs for Ebola Treatments

Mining Existing Drugs for Ebola Treatments

By | December 17, 2014

Researchers hope to repurpose already-approved drugs into potential anti-Ebola therapies.

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image: Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

By | December 15, 2014

Meningitis-causing bacteria exerted strong evolutionary pressure on an iron-binding protein in primates, a study shows.

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image: Bird Genomes Abound

Bird Genomes Abound

By | December 11, 2014

Scientists complete the largest-ever comparative genomic study of birds.

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image: Evolution in Oil Droplets

Evolution in Oil Droplets

By | December 9, 2014

For the first time, researchers have mimicked biological evolution using chemicals instead of living organisms.

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image: Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

By | December 1, 2014

By horizontal gene transfer, an antibacterial gene family has dispersed to a plant, an insect, several fungi, and an archaeon.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>One Plus One Equals One</em>

Book Excerpt from One Plus One Equals One

By | December 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “Green Evolution, Green Revolution,” author John Archibald describes how endosymbiosis helped color the Earth in a verdant hue.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2014

Your Atomic Self, Eureka!, A Talent for Friendship, and Undeniable

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image: Microflora for Hire

Microflora for Hire

By | December 1, 2014

The guts of cows and termites harbor microbes that are renowned complex-carbohydrate digesters, but the human gastrointestinal tract has flora that just might measure up.

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