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image: The Ultimate Wingman

The Ultimate Wingman

By | November 1, 2013

Differential gene expression between dominant and subordinate male turkeys could help evolutionary biologists deconstruct the roots of sexual dimorphism.

1 Comment

image: 2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2013

The Scientist opened up its annual Salary Survey to our international readers for the first time, revealing stark differences between average pay in the U.S., Europe, and the rest of the world.

9 Comments

image: Gravity Determines Cell Size

Gravity Determines Cell Size

By | October 29, 2013

Researchers show that cells may have evolved to be small because of gravitational forces.

1 Comment

image: Evolving Pain Resistance

Evolving Pain Resistance

By | October 24, 2013

Grasshopper mice harbor mutations in a pain-transmitting sodium channel that allow them to prey on highly toxic bark scorpions.

2 Comments

image: Ancient Bee Die Out

Ancient Bee Die Out

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers show that one group of bees likely suffered a mass extinction about 65 million years ago.

1 Comment

image: Company Size Won’t Predict Success

Company Size Won’t Predict Success

By | October 23, 2013

New analysis finds that the size of a company is not tied to getting a drug to market.

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image: Confirmed Venomous Crustacean

Confirmed Venomous Crustacean

By | October 22, 2013

Researchers show that a cave-dwelling crustacean may use venom to immobilize and digest its prey.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Academic Waste

Opinion: Academic Waste

By | October 17, 2013

From funding to publishing, academic research needlessly burns through time and money.

3 Comments

image: Fossilized Mosquito Blood Meal

Fossilized Mosquito Blood Meal

By | October 14, 2013

Researchers have discovered a 46-million-year-old female mosquito containing the remnants of the insect’s final blood meal.

1 Comment

image: More Evidence MERS Came from Bats

More Evidence MERS Came from Bats

By | October 10, 2013

Genomic analysis suggests that the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus circulated among bats for a while before jumping to humans.  

0 Comments

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