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The Scientist

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image: Teenage Drug Hunter

Teenage Drug Hunter

By | March 1, 2013

An Oregon teenager spent a summer in a New York biochemistry lab helping to discover a novel molecule that could become the next commercial nonaddictive painkiller.

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image: Is Frog Skin a Red Herring?

Is Frog Skin a Red Herring?

By | January 2, 2013

Despite decades of work, compounds in frog skins have failed to yield new antibiotics. Why?

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Parachuting off the Patent Cliff

Opinion: Parachuting off the Patent Cliff

By | December 6, 2012

As the United States edges ever closer to the dreaded fiscal cliff, the pharmaceutical industry approaches a precipice of its own.

4 Comments

image: Neil Bence: Manipulating Degradation

Neil Bence: Manipulating Degradation

By | December 1, 2012

Senior Scientist, Millennium Pharmaceuticals: The Takeda Oncology Company Age: 39

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image: Tumor Snipers

Tumor Snipers

By | November 1, 2012

After two headline successes, companies rush to develop “smart bomb” cancer drugs.

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image: Next Generation: The Heart Camera

Next Generation: The Heart Camera

By | June 19, 2012

A new camera system allows researchers to measure multiple cardiac signals at once to understand how they interact to control heart function.

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