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image: Performance Art

Performance Art

By | January 1, 2015

Regulation of genome expression orchestrates the behavior of insect castes and the human response to social stress.

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image: Picturing Infection

Picturing Infection

By | January 1, 2015

Whole-animal, light-based imaging of infected small mammals

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image: Why, Oh Y?

Why, Oh Y?

By | January 1, 2015

A toothpick and a bit of chance shaped David Page’s career, which he has dedicated to understanding the mammalian Y chromosome and fetal germ cell development.

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image: The Genetics of Society

The Genetics of Society

By | January 1, 2015

Researchers aim to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which a single genotype gives rise to diverse castes in eusocial organisms.

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image: Unraveling H7N9’s History

Unraveling H7N9’s History

By | December 30, 2014

An analysis of stored samples shows that H7N9 precursor H9N2, a virus widespread in chickens, has shown increased fitness in recent years.

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image: Measuring DNA with a Smartphone

Measuring DNA with a Smartphone

By | December 23, 2014

A new microscope attachment can allow smartphone users to take a closer look at fluorescently labeled DNA.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 18, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Imagining a “World Without Microbes”

Imagining a “World Without Microbes”

By | December 18, 2014

Eradication of microbial disease likely accompanied by poor quality of life for remaining species

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image: Microbes Could Help Solve Sex Crimes

Microbes Could Help Solve Sex Crimes

By | December 17, 2014

Microbial species found in pubic hair samples could help track down criminals.

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image: Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

By | December 15, 2014

Meningitis-causing bacteria exerted strong evolutionary pressure on an iron-binding protein in primates, a study shows.

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