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image: The Oldest of Them All

The Oldest of Them All

By | August 12, 2016

Greenland sharks can live an estimated 400 years, beating the previous vertebrate longevity record, scientists report.

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image: Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

Hunger Hormone Slows Aging in Mice

By | February 3, 2016

Signs of getting older are less common among rodents with ramped-up ghrelin production.

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image: Calorie-Restricted Yeast Live Longer

Calorie-Restricted Yeast Live Longer

By | July 14, 2015

Calorie restriction in the organism extends lifespan, supporting a long-standing view that had been challenged by a study published last year.

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image: Periodic Fasting Improves Rodent Health

Periodic Fasting Improves Rodent Health

By | June 18, 2015

And a diet that includes a few days of caloric restriction each month reduces biomarkers of aging and disease in people, according to a small trial.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2015

March 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: Week in Review: October 6–10

Week in Review: October 6–10

By | October 10, 2014

Nobel Prizes awarded; transgenerational effects of mitochondrial mutations; fat-targeted gene knockdown; Ebola updates in Spain and U.S.

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image: Longevity Diet

Longevity Diet

By | June 1, 2014

Researchers unmask a gene that protects C. elegans from lifespan-shrinking metabolic byproducts.

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image: No Pain, Big Gain

No Pain, Big Gain

By | May 22, 2014

Eliminating a pain receptor makes mice live longer and keeps their metabolisms young.

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image: Lifespan Tied to Pheromones

Lifespan Tied to Pheromones

By | December 2, 2013

In worms and flies, the presence of the opposite sex can reduce longevity.

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image: Mutant Mice Live Longer

Mutant Mice Live Longer

By | August 29, 2013

Reducing the levels of mTOR in rodents extends their lifespan by about 20 percent, though not without consequences.

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