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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: Anti-CRISPR Protein Reduces Off-Target Effects

Anti-CRISPR Protein Reduces Off-Target Effects

By | July 12, 2017

AcrIIA4, an inhibitor protein from the Listeria bacteriophage, can block DNA from binding to Cas9 during genome editing.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Ancient Protein Helps <em>E. coli</em> Thwart Viral Attack

Ancient Protein Helps E. coli Thwart Viral Attack

By | May 9, 2017

When engineered to use a four-billion-year-old version of the protein thioredoxin, the bacteria can stall bacteriophage replication, a new study shows.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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