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Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Hormone Hangover

Hormone Hangover

By | February 1, 2016

Medication to prevent prematurity in humans harms cognitive flexibility in rats.

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | January 28, 2016

The virus continues to spread as countries issue pregnancy advisories and drug firms pick up on vaccine development.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | January 25, 2016

Health officials expect the virus to spread to nearly all countries in the Americas and expand warnings for pregnant women.

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Counting Cells

By | January 11, 2016

A person likely carries the same number of human and microbial cells, according to a new estimate.

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All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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image: Researchers Accused of Spreading Disease

Researchers Accused of Spreading Disease

By | December 21, 2015

Italian scientists are under investigation for allegedly worsening the transmission of a pathogen that is decimating olive groves in Puglia.

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