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Impure Genius

By | February 1, 2011

Lewis Cantley has made a career of turning chemical contaminants into groundbreaking discoveries—including novel lipids, potent inhibitors, and kinases involved in cancer.

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image: Face to Face with the Emotional Brain

Face to Face with the Emotional Brain

By | February 1, 2011

Amygdala responses to the facial signals of others predict both normal and abnormal emotional states. An understanding of the brain chemistry underlying these responses will lead to new strategies for treating and predicting psychopathology.

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Stress and Inflammation

By | February 1, 2011

Stress and inflammation Cardiovascular disease, including coronary artery disease and stroke, is the single greatest cause of death worldwide and is a major burden on health services and society. 

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image: When Stress Is Good

When Stress Is Good

By | February 1, 2011

Fast blood flow protects against atherosclerosis: implications for treatment

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Time and Temperature

By | February 1, 2011

Editor's choice in physiology

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Losers Fight Back

By | February 1, 2011

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2011

February 2011's selection of notable quotes

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image: Down but Not Out

Down but Not Out

By | February 1, 2011

Cells on standby are surprisingly busy.

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image: Jeremy Reiter: Hunting for Cilia

Jeremy Reiter: Hunting for Cilia

By | January 1, 2011

Assistant professor of biochemistry, University of California, San Francisco. Age: 39

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image: Top 7 From F1000

Top 7 From F1000

By | January 1, 2011

A snapshot of the highest-ranked articles from a 30-day period on Faculty of 1000

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