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image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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image: A Tribe of Hornbill Hunters Turns to Conservation

A Tribe of Hornbill Hunters Turns to Conservation

By | September 1, 2016

An indigenous community in northeastern India is a crucial part of the effort to save these majestic forest birds from extinction.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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image: Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

By | August 31, 2016

A commercially available glioblastoma cell line appears to be from a different source than its stated origins.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | August 24, 2016

More locally acquired cases in Florida; fetal brain damage investigated

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image: CDC: Zika Virus Spreading in Miami Beach

CDC: Zika Virus Spreading in Miami Beach

By | August 22, 2016

With new reports of mosquito-borne transmission, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns pregnant women to avoid the area.

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image: Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

By | August 16, 2016

Exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides is correlated with population declines of a large number of wild bee species, according to a field study conducted in the U.K.

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image: The Badger-Cow TB Connection

The Badger-Cow TB Connection

By | August 5, 2016

Researchers in the U.K. report that badgers may be passing tuberculosis to farm animals not through direct contact, as was previously suspected, but through exposure to urine and feces.

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