The Scientist

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image: Sleeping for Two

Sleeping for Two

By | March 1, 2016

Poor slumber during pregnancy may have consequences beyond gestation.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | February 1, 2016

Link to microcephaly questioned; vaccine timeline expedited; thousands of Zika-exposed pregnancies reported in Colombia

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Hormone Hangover

Hormone Hangover

By | February 1, 2016

Medication to prevent prematurity in humans harms cognitive flexibility in rats.

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | January 28, 2016

The virus continues to spread as countries issue pregnancy advisories and drug firms pick up on vaccine development.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | January 25, 2016

Health officials expect the virus to spread to nearly all countries in the Americas and expand warnings for pregnant women.

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image: Pregnancy May Explain Ebola Return

Pregnancy May Explain Ebola Return

By | December 21, 2015

Health officials suspect recently reported cases of the disease in Liberia might stem from a flare-up of the virus in a survivor who became pregnant.

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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