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Spruce and pine and have relied on similar genetic toolkits for climate adaptation despite millions of years of evolution.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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image: The Topography of Teeth

The Topography of Teeth

By | November 29, 2016

Intricate, digital maps of animals’ teeth, created using the same geographical tools used by mapmakers, may help researchers determine the diets of extinct species.

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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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Obesity-associated microbiome composition can persist after weight loss, affecting the exchange of metabolites between a mouse and its resident bugs, researchers report.

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image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

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image: Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

By | November 9, 2016

Natural selection may be behind the dearth of Neanderthal DNA in modern humans.

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image: Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

By | November 7, 2016

A mutation that appeared early in the 2014 outbreak made the virus more infectious in humans, scientists show.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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