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image: Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

By | May 1, 2015

Principal Investigator, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard. Age: 33

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image: Llamas as Lab Rats

Llamas as Lab Rats

By | May 1, 2015

From diagnostics to vaccines, llama antibodies point to new directions in HIV research.

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image: Looking for Latent HIV

Looking for Latent HIV

By | May 1, 2015

Sequencing HIV integration sites suggests that clonally expanded T-cell populations may not be the main source of latent virus.

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image: Soluble Signal

Soluble Signal

By | May 1, 2015

An immune protein previously thought to mark inactive T cells has a free-floating form that correlates with HIV disease progression.

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image: Defeating the Virus

Defeating the Virus

By | May 1, 2015

Recent discoveries are spurring a renaissance in HIV vaccine research and development.

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image: Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

By | April 17, 2015

A newly discovered protein promotes immunity to viruses and cancer by triggering the production of cytotoxic T cells.

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image: Study: Acidic Oceans Behind Extinctions

Study: Acidic Oceans Behind Extinctions

By | April 13, 2015

Massive die-offs of just about every marine species millions of years ago are thought to have resulted from a surge of carbon dioxide.

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image: Studying Ebola Survivors

Studying Ebola Survivors

By | April 6, 2015

A scientist jumps at the chance to study the blood of four Ebola survivors to better understand how the immune system responds to the deadly virus. 

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image: Cancer Immunotherapist

Cancer Immunotherapist

By | April 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Yvonne Saenger explains recent advances in using biomarkers to identify cancer patients who might benefit most from immunotherapy.

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image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

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