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image: The Handedness of Cells

The Handedness of Cells

By | June 17, 2015

Actin—the bones of the cell—has a preference for swirling into a counterclockwise pattern.

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image: Prominent Cell Biologist Dies

Prominent Cell Biologist Dies

By | May 4, 2015

Cytoskeleton specialist Alan Hall was best known for unpacking the roles of Rho GTPases.   

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Study: Acidic Oceans Behind Extinctions

Study: Acidic Oceans Behind Extinctions

By | April 13, 2015

Massive die-offs of just about every marine species millions of years ago are thought to have resulted from a surge of carbon dioxide.

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image: Cellular Garbage Disposal Illuminated

Cellular Garbage Disposal Illuminated

By | April 13, 2015

A Harvard team shows how cells label and recognize proteins for degradation.

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image: 2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

By | April 13, 2015

Submissions are officially open for this year’s Top 10 Innovations contest.

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image: A Benefit of Failed Pregnancy?

A Benefit of Failed Pregnancy?

By | April 9, 2015

Scientists find a common genetic variant in mothers that decreases the chance of successful pregnancy.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>p53</em>

Book Excerpt from p53

By | April 1, 2015

In Chapter 12, "Of Mice and Men," author Sue Armstrong recounts the point at which researchers moved from working with p53 in tissue culture to studying the gene in animal models.

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image: Cancer Immunotherapist

Cancer Immunotherapist

By | April 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Yvonne Saenger explains recent advances in using biomarkers to identify cancer patients who might benefit most from immunotherapy.

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image: Cancer Kismet

Cancer Kismet

By | April 1, 2015

Fate mapping allows researchers to follow cancer progression from its cell type of origin.

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