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image: Extinct River Dolphin Species Discovered

Extinct River Dolphin Species Discovered

By | August 16, 2016

Overlooked for half a century, a skull in the Smithsonian collection points to a dolphin species that lived 25 million years ago, according to a study.

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image: Study: Last Woolly Mammoths Died of Thirst

Study: Last Woolly Mammoths Died of Thirst

By | August 3, 2016

On remote island near Alaska, salt water intrusion and a warming climate killed off the last remaining survivors of the species.

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More than half of the world’s land may have passed the threshold that threatens long-term sustainable development, researchers report.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: New Species Celebrated

New Species Celebrated

By | May 24, 2016

A top-10 list compiled by a committee of taxonomists includes a new hominin species and a beetle named after a children’s book character.

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image: SUNY-ESF’s Top 10 New Species 2016

SUNY-ESF’s Top 10 New Species 2016

By | May 24, 2016

A look at State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry scientists’ picks

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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