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image: Tigers May Get a Second Chance in Central Asia

Tigers May Get a Second Chance in Central Asia

By | January 25, 2017

Before their extinction in the 1960s, Caspian tigers once roamed Central Asia. Now scientists want to bring Amur Tiger cubs to areas where the extinct subspecies once lived.

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image: Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

By | January 11, 2017

Researchers attempt to estimate how much of the human genome’s methylation patterns can be attributed to genetic ancestry.

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image: Long Egg Incubations May Have Doomed the Dinosaurs

Long Egg Incubations May Have Doomed the Dinosaurs

By | January 5, 2017

An investigation of fossilized teeth reveals that some dinosaurs took more than six months to hatch, hindering their abilities to procreate quickly and efficiently.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Pharma Redo

Pharma Redo

By | January 1, 2017

Steve Braun of Cures Within Reach, a nonprofit focused on breathing new life into old medicines, describes the potential benefits of drug repurposing.

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image: Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

By | December 27, 2016

Estimating only 7,100 individuals remaining, researchers urge a reclassification of the species from vulnerable to endangered.

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Oncologists have raised concerns about a mouse study that suggests the vaccine for human papillomavirus could cause brain damage.

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image: IUCN Declares Giraffes Vulnerable to Extinction

IUCN Declares Giraffes Vulnerable to Extinction

By | December 9, 2016

The iconic mammals have been declining in number for decades and could face extinction if conservation measures are not enacted.

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image: Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

By | December 1, 2016

Successful late-stage clinical trials could mark the maturation of a new drug development platform, but the path to commercialization is not without hurdles.

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image: More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

By | November 9, 2016

Researchers say they have sufficient in vitro and animal data to apply for human testing.

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