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image: Tiger Hunt, 1838–1840

Tiger Hunt, 1838–1840

By | August 1, 2014

Zoologist John Gould undertook a financially risky expedition to document the birds of Australia—and found some unique mammals in a perilous situation.

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image: Emperor Penguins on Thin Ice

Emperor Penguins on Thin Ice

By | June 30, 2014

A new model suggests emperor penguin populations could decline by 19 percent by 2100.

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image: Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

By | April 11, 2014

Researchers collate a list of the 100 most rare and unique avian species facing extinction.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2014

April 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

By | March 26, 2014

New research suggests that the wooly beasts may have succumbed to a shrinking gene pool or intense environmental pressures as their species went extinct.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2014

The Sixth Extinction, Joy, Guilt, Anger, Love, Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why, and Ten Thousand Birds

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image: Sharks and Rays in Danger

Sharks and Rays in Danger

By | January 23, 2014

A new report finds that about a quarter of the world’s cartilaginous fish species are at risk of extinction.

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image: New Species Abound

New Species Abound

By | December 26, 2013

A look at 2013’s noteworthy new species

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image: Trouble for Darwin’s Frogs

Trouble for Darwin’s Frogs

By | November 21, 2013

Chytrid fungus has likely driven the decline of two South American frog species named for Charles Darwin.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | November 18, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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