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image: Searching for Snails

Searching for Snails

By | December 1, 2012

A graduate student rediscovers a snail species officially declared extinct in 2000.

1 Comment

image: Old New Species

Old New Species

By | November 20, 2012

Decades can pass between the discovery of a new animal or plant and its official debut in the scientific literature.

4 Comments

image: Extinction Risk for Invertebrates

Extinction Risk for Invertebrates

By | September 4, 2012

A new report estimates that human activities as well as other factors are threatening 20 percent of all invertebrate species, including corals and freshwater snails.

1 Comment

image: Frog-Killing Fungus Thrives

Frog-Killing Fungus Thrives

By | August 15, 2012

Global trade in live bullfrogs and a more volatile, changing climate worsen a deadly amphibian fungus.

0 Comments

image: Mass Extinctions Set the Pace

Mass Extinctions Set the Pace

By | July 4, 2012

The rate of evolution is affected for millenia after mass extinctions.

6 Comments

image: “Extinct” Toad Rediscovered

“Extinct” Toad Rediscovered

By | June 21, 2012

A yellow-bellied dwarf toad, last sighted in 1876, is rediscovered in Sri Lanka.

0 Comments

image: Modern Day Mammoth?

Modern Day Mammoth?

By | December 6, 2011

Researchers at Japanese and Russian institutions believe cloning a woolly mammoth is within reach.

6 Comments

image: Biodiversity

Biodiversity

By | October 1, 2011

Ecosystems are failing and extinction rates are soaring. Thomas E. Lovejoy and Edward O. Wilson weigh in on why cataloging existing species, discovering new ones, and maintaining a balanced and diverse global ecosystem are critical for ensuring a habitable environment for all.

0 Comments

image: Fighting to exist

Fighting to exist

By | June 14, 2011

The more closely related two species are, the more they're apt to drive one another to extinction.

24 Comments

image: Pick your frog poison

Pick your frog poison

By | May 31, 2011

Human development may destroy natural habitats, but it could also provide amphibians with a safe haven from deadly fungal infections.

0 Comments

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