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image: Confirmed Venomous Crustacean

Confirmed Venomous Crustacean

By | October 22, 2013

Researchers show that a cave-dwelling crustacean may use venom to immobilize and digest its prey.

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image: Fossilized Mosquito Blood Meal

Fossilized Mosquito Blood Meal

By | October 14, 2013

Researchers have discovered a 46-million-year-old female mosquito containing the remnants of the insect’s final blood meal.

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image: More Evidence MERS Came from Bats

More Evidence MERS Came from Bats

By | October 10, 2013

Genomic analysis suggests that the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus circulated among bats for a while before jumping to humans.  

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image: Sniffing out Alzheimer’s

Sniffing out Alzheimer’s

By | October 9, 2013

A peanut-butter smell test could help diagnose the neurodegenerative disease in its early stages.

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image: Pheromone for the Young

Pheromone for the Young

By | October 2, 2013

Researchers identify a compound in juvenile mice that inhibits the sexual advances of adult males.

3 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Evolution and Medicine</em>

Book Excerpt from Evolution and Medicine

By | October 1, 2013

In Chapter 11, “Man-made diseases,” author Robert Perlman describes how socioeconomic health disparities arise in hierarchical societies.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Yoav Gilad: Gene Regulator

Yoav Gilad: Gene Regulator

By | October 1, 2013

Professor, Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago. Age: 38

3 Comments

image: A Pheromone by Any Other Name

A Pheromone by Any Other Name

By | October 1, 2013

Long known to play a role in sexual attraction, pheromones are revealing their influence over a range of nonsexual behaviors as researchers tease apart the neural circuitry that translates smells into action.

2 Comments

image: That New Baby Smell

That New Baby Smell

By | September 25, 2013

New moms’ brains show a stronger response to infant body odor than do the brains of women who aren’t mothers.

2 Comments

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