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Researchers use a century of trade records to uncover differences in the resilience of terrestrial and aquatic species.

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image: Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

By | December 27, 2016

Estimating only 7,100 individuals remaining, researchers urge a reclassification of the species from vulnerable to endangered.

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image: Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

By | December 1, 2016

Researchers discover diverse communities of invertebrates inhabiting the water-filled tracks of elephants in Uganda.

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image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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image: Ocean Viruses Cataloged

Ocean Viruses Cataloged

By | September 21, 2016

An international research team triples the number of known virus types found in marine environments. 

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Policymakers’ choice of seawater intakes highlights California’s troubling embrace of unproven technologies.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | September 7, 2016

Virus’s genome to aid in diagnoses; bees caught in crossfire of mosquito sprays; Zika spreads in Asia; US Congress revisits Zika funding

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image: A Tribe of Hornbill Hunters Turns to Conservation

A Tribe of Hornbill Hunters Turns to Conservation

By | September 1, 2016

An indigenous community in northeastern India is a crucial part of the effort to save these majestic forest birds from extinction.

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image: Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

By | August 16, 2016

Exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides is correlated with population declines of a large number of wild bee species, according to a field study conducted in the U.K.

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image: The Badger-Cow TB Connection

The Badger-Cow TB Connection

By | August 5, 2016

Researchers in the U.K. report that badgers may be passing tuberculosis to farm animals not through direct contact, as was previously suspected, but through exposure to urine and feces.

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