The Scientist

» cell therapy and immunology

Most Recent

image: Ebola’s Immune Escape

Ebola’s Immune Escape

By | November 3, 2015

The virus can persist in several tissues where the immune system is less active. Researchers are working to better understand this phenomenon and how it can stall the clearing of Ebola in survivors.

1 Comment

image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

0 Comments

image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

0 Comments

image: Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

By | October 27, 2015

The World Health Organization recommends more pilot trials.

0 Comments

image: Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

By | October 26, 2015

Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers identify a subset of proinflammatory cytokine-producing B cells that may spark multiple sclerosis-related inflammation.  

0 Comments

image: Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers design antibody-like proteins to awaken and destroy HIV holdouts.

0 Comments

image: Growing Placenta-Generating Cells

Growing Placenta-Generating Cells

By | October 14, 2015

Researchers derive trophoblast stem cells from mouse fibroblasts, paving the way for cell therapy for placental dysfunction diseases.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

0 Comments

image: Dengue’s Downfall?

Dengue’s Downfall?

By | September 15, 2015

Researchers characterize a protein that could be key to the virus’s virulence—and to developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne disease.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  2. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs
RayBiotech