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The Scientist

» 3-D printing and microbiology

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image: Golden Goose Awards Given Again

Golden Goose Awards Given Again

By | September 12, 2013

Researchers behind high-impact studies that at first seemed obscure are honored in another round of prizes.

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image: Obesity via Microbe Transplants

Obesity via Microbe Transplants

By | September 5, 2013

Germ-free mice gain weight when transplanted with gut microbes from obese humans, in a diet-dependent manner.

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image: Decoding Drug-Resistant TB

Decoding Drug-Resistant TB

By | September 1, 2013

Researchers characterize drug-resistant tuberculosis by analyzing the genomes of more than 500 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from around the world.

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image: Printing Ears

Printing Ears

By | September 1, 2013

Cornell University biomedical engineer Lawrence Bonassar 3-D prints ears using “ink” that contains living cells.

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image: Printing Life

Printing Life

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing allows tissue engineers to fabricate more-complex shapes and to precisely mix biological materials.

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image: You Are <em>When</em> You Eat

You Are When You Eat

By | September 1, 2013

Circadian time zones and metabolism

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image: Organs on Demand

Organs on Demand

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing has made inroads in the clinic, but constructing functional complex organs still faces major hurdles.

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image: Medical 3-D Printing’s Frontiers

Medical 3-D Printing’s Frontiers

By | August 22, 2013

Layer-by-layer manufacturing techniques could help re-make human body parts, or produce entirely new biocompatible machines.

1 Comment

image: Eat Less and Live Longer?

Eat Less and Live Longer?

By | August 13, 2013

Mice on a low-calorie diet harbor a distinct population of gut microorganisms that helps prolong life.

5 Comments

image: Lab-Grown Ear

Lab-Grown Ear

By | August 1, 2013

Scientists used a titanium wire framework to help ears made from collagen and sheep cartilage cells maintain their shape.

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