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» 3-D printing and immunology

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image: HIV’s Stealth Revealed

HIV’s Stealth Revealed

By | November 21, 2013

HIV-1 evades the immune system with a protein shield, which can be lifted.

2 Comments

image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.

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image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: I Want My Kidney

Opinion: I Want My Kidney

By | November 7, 2013

With the advent of xenotransplantation, tissues made from cell-seeded scaffolds, and 3-D-printing, custom-made organs must be right around the corner.

9 Comments

image: Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

By | November 6, 2013

Cells that temporarily restrain their immune systems give babies’ gut bacteria a chance to settle down. 

1 Comment

image: Frisky Fruit Flies

Frisky Fruit Flies

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that Drosophila females upregulate an immune gene for protection against sexually transmitted infections before copulation.

1 Comment

image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

4 Comments

image: Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

By | October 20, 2013

An immune suppressive drug can unexpectedly help immunized mice fight off many strains of flu.

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image: Week in Review: October 7–11

Week in Review: October 7–11

By | October 11, 2013

Nobels awarded for vesicle trafficking and computational chemistry; building 3-D microbial communities; mislabeled microbes cause retractions

0 Comments

image: Building 3-D Microbial Communities

Building 3-D Microbial Communities

By | October 7, 2013

Researchers apply a 3-D printing technique to structure populations of bacteria in a three-dimensional environment.

0 Comments

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