The Scientist

» 3-D printing and immunology

Most Recent

image: Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

By | October 20, 2013

An immune suppressive drug can unexpectedly help immunized mice fight off many strains of flu.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: October 7–11

Week in Review: October 7–11

By | October 11, 2013

Nobels awarded for vesicle trafficking and computational chemistry; building 3-D microbial communities; mislabeled microbes cause retractions

0 Comments

image: Building 3-D Microbial Communities

Building 3-D Microbial Communities

By | October 7, 2013

Researchers apply a 3-D printing technique to structure populations of bacteria in a three-dimensional environment.

0 Comments

image: Printing Ears

Printing Ears

By | September 1, 2013

Cornell University biomedical engineer Lawrence Bonassar 3-D prints ears using “ink” that contains living cells.

2 Comments

image: Printing Life

Printing Life

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing allows tissue engineers to fabricate more-complex shapes and to precisely mix biological materials.

0 Comments

image: You Are <em>When</em> You Eat

You Are When You Eat

By | September 1, 2013

Circadian time zones and metabolism

0 Comments

image: Organs on Demand

Organs on Demand

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing has made inroads in the clinic, but constructing functional complex organs still faces major hurdles.

2 Comments

image: Medical 3-D Printing’s Frontiers

Medical 3-D Printing’s Frontiers

By | August 22, 2013

Layer-by-layer manufacturing techniques could help re-make human body parts, or produce entirely new biocompatible machines.

1 Comment

image: Lab-Grown Ear

Lab-Grown Ear

By | August 1, 2013

Scientists used a titanium wire framework to help ears made from collagen and sheep cartilage cells maintain their shape.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech