The Scientist

» 3-D printing and disease/medicine

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By | September 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.

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image: Printing Ears

Printing Ears

By | September 1, 2013

Cornell University biomedical engineer Lawrence Bonassar 3-D prints ears using “ink” that contains living cells.

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image: Printing Life

Printing Life

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing allows tissue engineers to fabricate more-complex shapes and to precisely mix biological materials.

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image: Remaking a Classic

Remaking a Classic

By | September 1, 2013

Companies are bursting at the seams with tools to engineer pharma’s next magic bullet: the new and improved antibody.

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image: You Are <em>When</em> You Eat

You Are When You Eat

By | September 1, 2013

Circadian time zones and metabolism

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

image: Organs on Demand

Organs on Demand

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing has made inroads in the clinic, but constructing functional complex organs still faces major hurdles.

2 Comments

image: Medical 3-D Printing’s Frontiers

Medical 3-D Printing’s Frontiers

By | August 22, 2013

Layer-by-layer manufacturing techniques could help re-make human body parts, or produce entirely new biocompatible machines.

1 Comment

image: Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

By | August 15, 2013

Continuously eating fatty foods perturbs communication between the gut and brain, which in turn perpetuates a bad diet.

8 Comments

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