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The Scientist

» synapse and evolution

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image: Drunks and Monkeys

Drunks and Monkeys

By | June 1, 2014

Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans.  

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image: For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

By | May 29, 2014

Two island populations of male crickets independently evolved to evade parasites by keeping quiet, and have come up with a way to sneak matings with females that still seek the male courtship song.

2 Comments

image: Top 10 New Species

Top 10 New Species

By | May 23, 2014

The International Institute for Species Exploration announces its picks of novel species discovered in the past year, including a carnivorous mammal, a tiny shrimp, and a fungus.

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image: Week in Review: May 5–9

Week in Review: May 5–9

By | May 9, 2014

Synthetic base pairs replicated in vivo; cardiac stem cells questioned; miniature neurotransmissions and synaptic development; neurogenesis and memory loss; STAP saga continues

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image: Back from the Blacklist?

Back from the Blacklist?

By | May 8, 2014

Disgraced psychology researcher Marc Hauser, who was found guilty of data fabrication and falsification during his time at Harvard, publishes two new papers.

1 Comment

image: Minis Ensure Synaptic Maturation

Minis Ensure Synaptic Maturation

By | May 7, 2014

Once considered neurotransmission-related noise, scientists now show that the spontaneous release of presynaptic vesicles is imperative for the maturation of Drosophila synapses.

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image: Not So Different

Not So Different

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unearth little evidence to suggest modern humans are superior to their Neanderthal ancestors.

4 Comments

image: Fuel Gauge

Fuel Gauge

By | May 1, 2014

An optical reporter quantitatively measures the ATP demands of presynaptic neurons.

2 Comments

image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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