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image: Lab-Made Coronavirus Triggers Debate

Lab-Made Coronavirus Triggers Debate

By | November 16, 2015

The creation of a chimeric SARS-like virus has scientists discussing the risks of gain-of-function research.

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image: Khaleel Razak: Hearing Engineer

Khaleel Razak: Hearing Engineer

By | September 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology University of California, Riverside. Age: 44

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image: Mammal–Carnivorous Plant Mutualism

Mammal–Carnivorous Plant Mutualism

By | July 13, 2015

A pitcher plant species in Borneo attracts bat inhabitants by reflecting sonar signals from the flying mammals, advertising a cozy roost, and getting nitrogen-rich guano in return.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | April 8, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Bats the Source of Ebola?

Bats the Source of Ebola?

By | December 30, 2014

The epidemic in West Africa may have been sparked by bats in Guinea, researchers propose, but concrete evidence of the route of zoonotic infection is lacking.

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image: 2014’s Best in Multimedia

2014’s Best in Multimedia

By | December 28, 2014

The Scientist’s standout videos and slideshows of the year

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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image: Bat Navigation Revealed

Bat Navigation Revealed

By | December 4, 2014

As the flying mammals navigate complex environments, they make use of specialized brain cells that cooperate to build a coordinate system that works in three dimensions.

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image: Bad Raps

Bad Raps

By | December 1, 2014

Understanding animal diseases—for their sake and for ours

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