The Scientist

» neurogenesis and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

0 Comments

image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

0 Comments

image: Microbes Meet Cancer

Microbes Meet Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

4 Comments

image: Startup Licenses “Vaginal Seeding” Approach

Startup Licenses “Vaginal Seeding” Approach

By | March 31, 2016

Boston-based Commense plans to develop microbial and nonmicrobial interventions aimed at improving child health.

0 Comments

image: Contacts May Affect Eye Microbiome

Contacts May Affect Eye Microbiome

By | March 23, 2016

The bacterial communities in the eyes of contact lens wearers resemble those of the skin, according to a study. 

0 Comments

image: Origins of Dysentery

Origins of Dysentery

By | March 22, 2016

A new genomic analysis reveals that the pathogen responsible for the gastrointestinal disease likely originated in Europe and hitched a ride to new lands with settlers.

0 Comments

image: Microbial Recycler Found

Microbial Recycler Found

By | March 14, 2016

Researchers discover a new species of bacteria that can break down a commonly used plastic.

3 Comments

image: Observing Nascent Neurons in Action

Observing Nascent Neurons in Action

By | March 14, 2016

Scientists image the activity of adult-born neurons in the brains of waking mice, and reveal roles for the cells in learning and memory.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

By | March 3, 2016

On “vaginal seeding” and the challenge of evidence-based parenting

0 Comments

image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Infant Microbiome: Vaginal Delivery Versus C-Section
  2. Immune System Maintains Brain Health
  3. Opinion: WHO’s Silence on Cannabis
  4. Top 10 Innovations 2016
    Features Top 10 Innovations 2016

    This year’s list of winners celebrates both large leaps and small (but important) steps in life science technology.

Rockland