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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

26 Comments

image: How Experience Shapes Adult Neurogenesis

How Experience Shapes Adult Neurogenesis

By | October 27, 2016

Interneurons and mature granule cells in the adult mouse brain are critical for newborn neurons’ responses to novel environments.

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: Zika Infects Adult Neural Progenitors Too

Zika Infects Adult Neural Progenitors Too

By | August 18, 2016

A mouse study shows that the virus has tropism for adult proliferative neural progenitor cells and immature neurons.

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image: Immune Cells' Roles in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

Immune Cells' Roles in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

By , , and | July 1, 2016

The cells of the mammalian immune system do more than just fight off pathogens; they are also important players in stem cell function and are thus crucial for maintaining homeostasis and recovering from injury.

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image: Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

By | June 23, 2016

Running releases an enzyme that is associated with memory function in mice and humans.  

3 Comments

image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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