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The Scientist

» medical marijuana, immunology and evolution

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2015

Stoned, Anxious, The Deeper Genome, and Testosterone

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image: High-Flying Ducks

High-Flying Ducks

By | July 1, 2015

Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.

1 Comment

image: How to Make a New Species

How to Make a New Species

By | July 1, 2015

Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.

3 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2015

July 2015's selection of notable quotes

5 Comments

image: Diagnosing Ebola in 15 Minutes

Diagnosing Ebola in 15 Minutes

By | June 30, 2015

A new test that scans for the Ebola virus with just a fingerprick could be a practical diagnostic for use in West Africa.

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Scientists wishing to study marijuana’s health effects may now forgo a review by Public Health Services.

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image: Sex Differences in Pain Pathway

Sex Differences in Pain Pathway

By | June 29, 2015

Male and female mice utilize different immune cells to process pain, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: Edible Marijuana Labels Wrong

Edible Marijuana Labels Wrong

By | June 24, 2015

The dosage information on 83 percent of 75 edible marijuana products legally sold in Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles was incorrect.

2 Comments

image: Roos Are Mainly South Paws

Roos Are Mainly South Paws

By | June 22, 2015

A new study shows that kangaroos are predominantly left-handed.

1 Comment

image: Neutralizing HIV

Neutralizing HIV

By | June 18, 2015

Engineered immunogens based on conserved patches of the virus’s envelope protein point to new strategies for vaccine design.

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